Probably the twentieth century’s most controversial movement, Brutalism was characterised by its utilitarian style, modular elements and the functional use of concrete and steel

Published in Features

Thamesmead was designed to be a revolutionary housing estate but, like many of its Brutalist contemporaries, it failed to meet its utopian goals

Published in Buildings

The Barbican Estate has topped the list of Britain’s ugliest buildings several times, yet the unique Brutalist complex is undoubtedly one of London’s most iconic structures

Published in Buildings

Ernö Goldfinger’s high-rise residential block in Poplar, East London was designed as a solution to London’s post-war housing problems 

Published in Buildings

The post-war architectural style, characterised by block-like forms usually cast in raw concrete or brick, defined an era of architecture in Britain 

Published in Buildings

Roehampton's Alton Estate is one of 10 buildings on the Twentieth Century Society’s list of buildings at risk of demolition. Edwin Heathcote argues for its survival

Published in Comment

Tom Dixon-designed roof bar has been axed from Centre Point, where apartments start at £1.8m. 

Published in News

Owen Hopkins provides a welcome antidote to the histrionics and heroising that blight our understanding of modernist architecture, says John Jervis

Published in Review
Friday, 22 April 2016 12:04

Concrete Concept

Christopher Beanland’s compendium of 50 brutalist buildings is a wholesome first introduction to brutalism, but will leave die-hard fans unsatisfied, says Peter Smisek

Published in Review
Tuesday, 29 July 2014 15:09

Brunswick Centre redevelopment

Levitt Bernstein’s proposal to build a restaurant above the cinema in the grade II-listed Brunswick Centre in Bloomsbury has met with vocal opposition from the residents of the complex, as well as leading architects such as Richard Rogers. Owen Hatherley explains why

Published in Comment

Towering over the crossroads between Covent Garden, Soho and Bloomsbury, the slender concrete lattice of Centre Point has, for the 40 years since its completion, been a beacon, helping to navigate merry wayfarers through the West End on a Friday night.