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In photos: Unusual details in Milan's architecture reveal an evolving city 01.04.19

  • Detail of Ettore Sottsass’s interiors for Malpensa airport, Milan

  • Entrance to a building designed by the Milanese architect Vico Magistretti, Milan

  • A building site in Venice

  • A mosque in a deconsecrated 16th-century church, Palermo

  • Torre Velasca, BBPR’s landmark modern tower in central Milan, completed in 1958

  • The Palazzo INA apartment building on Corso Sempione, Milan, designed by Piero Bottoni and built between 1953 and 1958

All photography by DSL Studio

Milan-based DSL Studio’s photographs of Italian cities explore the formal nature of architecture, treating everyday scenes and famous monuments with the same precision and clarity. These buildings define the spaces they occupy, but at the same time are shaped by the ever-changing urban scene.

The photographs take in everything from traditional Italian entrances and piazzas to buildings in the middle of transformation. Building fabrics and textures are represented at different stages and ages, whether it's an apartment from the 1950s or a 16th-century former church, now turned into a mosque.

Some of the images are part of DSL Studio's study of entryways in Milan, which shows the multitude of architectural styles and forms visible on a tour of the Italian design capital. The selection extended across an entire book, published by Taschen in 2017.

The studio's focus on architectural forms stems from the founders' own backgrounds and studies - Delfino Sisto Legnani and Marco Cappelletti founded the studio in 2015 after studying architecture and photography. The pair have collaborated with many of the world's biggest architecture firms and cultural organisations, including OMA and Rem Koolhaas, Kengo Kuma and Fondazione Prada.

This photo gallery originally appeared in Icon 191, the May 2019 edition, which also featured a preview of the Milan Triennale, a look at new, living building materials and two Italian icons of the month.

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