Wednesday, 16 December 2009 15:58

Sensate

A show that blurs body, furniture and space unnerves and delights Tania Ketenjian.

Published in Review
Wednesday, 16 December 2009 15:41

Lapse In Time

At Experimenta, one show promised a radical agenda. It got halfway, says Justin McGuirk.

Published in Review
Tuesday, 15 December 2009 16:59

Bauhaus: A Conceptual Model

This monster show celebrating the 90th birthday of the seminal modernist institution does a fine job of identifying its importance and probing its legacy, says Daniel Miller.

Published in Review
Monday, 14 December 2009 16:32

Futurism

In its effort to reclaim futurism as a serious school of painting, the Tate has jettisoned some of the best bits, says Owen Hatherley.

Published in Review
Friday, 11 December 2009 10:57

Ed Ruscha

It’s hard not to see this seminal artist’s work as a celebration of ephemeral America – but these days its glamour is less obvious.

Published in Review
Friday, 18 September 2009 11:02

Telling Tales

The V&A’s exploration of fantasy and fear in contemporary design is light on comforting bedtime stories and heavy on anxiety.

Published in Review
Tuesday, 18 August 2009 13:15

Frank Lloyd Wright

The life's work of Frank Lloyd Wright gets somewhat lost in the monumental ramped space of his masterpiece - but his relevance is still clear, says Alex Pasternack.

Published in Review
Tuesday, 18 August 2009 12:50

Speed Limits

Canada's CCA marks the futurist centenary by taking a lingering look at the cult of speed.

Published in Review
Friday, 14 August 2009 14:43

Framing Modernism

Modern architecture was fascist Italy's way of pretending to be civilised - the result is an eerie collection of photographs, says Owen Hatherley.

Published in Review
Friday, 14 August 2009 08:30

The Jazz Century

Once seen as part of pop music, jazz grew into its own cultural force and influenced everything along the way, writes Francesca Gavin.

Published in Review
Friday, 14 August 2009 04:00

Radical Nature

What do artists and architects have to say about our abusive relationship with the natural world? And since that topic is so timely, why does the most radical work come from the 1970s and 80s?

Published in Review
Wednesday, 05 August 2009 09:53

Vorspannkino

Little works of art within a film, the opening credits can combine utility and beauty.

Published in Review
Wednesday, 05 August 2009 05:19

Le Corbusier: The Art Of Architecture

The Picasso of architecture, the poet of the right angle, the Swiss 
psychotic ... Charles-Edouard Jeanneret had many faces, now explored 
at the Barbican.

Published in Review
Friday, 24 April 2009 10:55

Ray Johnson: Please Add to & Return

The mail art of Ray Johnson is a brilliant private form of self expression that reveals everything and nothing, writes Giovanna Dunmall.

Published in Review
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