LDF: Super Natural exhibition by Studio Toogood 01.10.10

iconeye Toogood Assemblage 620

On entering Studio Toogood's exhibition the bustle of the city fell away and your senses received an almighty hit of the countryside

On entering Studio Toogood's exhibition the bustle of the city falls away and your senses receive an almighty hit of the countryside. Super Natural, which was part of the Brompton Design District during the London Design Festival, celebrates foraging, collecting and observing rural England, with a focus on locally sourced materials and reviving English craftsmanship.

The cleverly executed exhibition brings nature and the countryside to each visitor through a variety of senses from start to finish. Beginning with New Forest forager Mrs Tee's wild mushroom installation, which is to be enjoyed whilst experiencing a specially crafted scent of lichen, wet leaves and tree bark by French perfumer Francis Kurkdjian.

A table made up of stone gabions dominates the exhibition space displaying Assemblage 1, Toogood's first collection of objects. Using simple geometric forms the focus is on the skill of the craftsmanship, cleverly revealed in the details. Element is a series of lights and a table using a sphere, cylinder and cube in various alignments in raw materials of wood, portland stone and brass.

Agricultural implements as well as materials and process influence the collection. Spade Chair merges a three-legged milking stool and a spade handle to create a seat, which has the option to include a roll to increase comfort. Also included in the Spade series is a stool, side table and dining table all produced in English sycamore and designed to work alongside one another.

iconeye Toogood Assemblage 2 1

Bin-bag reusing old binocular cases

iconeye Toogood Assemblage 2

Element Lamp in portland stone

iconeye Toogood Assemblage 3

Element table in stone brass and wood

iconeye Toogood Assemblage 4

Spade chair in English sycamore

 

Words

Claire Beard

quotes story

Super Natural celebrates foraging, collecting and observing rural England, with a focus on locally sourced materials and reviving English craftsmanship

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