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Pandering to oligarchs and creating glass corporate towers, luxury hotel suites or vast concrete monoliths are strictly excluded from this Russian artist-turned-architect's oeuvre.
20th-century system living, but it doesn’t.There are few chances today to write about social housing. Architecturally speaking, this is the age of the museum and the corporate icon.
The new building of the Ecole cantonale d'art de Lausanne (ECAL) has been built around the frame of a place that made hessian sacks and has kept its industrial feel - huge open spaces, bare walls, concrete floors, exposed services.

What do you use Sellotape for? Doctors use it to detect bacteria around the perineum, and to trap head lice. In fact, one doctor used Sellotape, along with brandy, a water bottle and a coat hanger, to save the life of a woman who suffered a collapsed lung on an international flight.

Wieki Somers and Bertjan Pot live round the corner from each other on the leafy outskirts of Rotterdam. Fellow graduates of Design Academy Eindhoven, they like to bounce ideas off each other and share lunch every now and then. They work intuitively, favouring trial and error over sterile conceptualism. But while Somers works like a lab technician, Pot is more concerned with surfaces and beauty.

I walk a lot, and I’m always noticing random things. London’s a wonderful place for that. This photo essay follows a route I picked. It’s not exactly a secret London, just one I like to keep noticing.
“Higher forces” was the theme for Hussein Chalayan’s 2008 Spring/Summer collection. The clothes are adorned with moving laser beams, a feat made possible by the expertise of London-based designer Moritz Waldemeyer.
What do you use Sellotape for? Doctors use it to detect bacteria around the perineum, and to trap head lice. In fact, one doctor used Sellotape, along with brandy, a water bottle and a coat hanger, to save the life of a woman who suffered a collapsed lung on an international flight.
Blown-up textbook illustrations decorate two workspaces of the ROC professional training school in Apeldoorn, the Netherlands.
Konstantin Grcic has reinvented the classic plastic cantilever chair. Half of the 4mm-thin chair is made up of holes, yet the net-like structure can support a weight of 500kg without shattering.
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